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the fertile paradox Posts

Has God ever stopped creating?

If we can think of anything that is true about God alone, it is the ability to Create ex nihilo. The event that is the defining symbol of God’s sovereign, limitless power is Creation ex nihilo. That God created the heavens and the earth, from nothing that was already existing, is foundational. All of what we know and believe about God is built upon the divine attributes and invisible qualities implied by God’s creating the entire cosmos. Creation ex nihilo is so important to belief in an omnipotent and transcendent God that the first attacks on God’s existence focus on whether the Bible speaks the truth about His creative work.

Because Creation is so foundational, we do not accept any ambiguity about the statement: “God created the heavens and the earth.” Our most familiar English translations of Genesis 1:1 are so final, so certain. But could it be possible that the Hebrew text is ambiguous in this very issue? Could it be possible that the Hebrew text leaves open the possibility that God is still working? Our English translations convey the sense that God created in the beginning, and it was complete. Our translations give me the impression of a child who has returned from school with news of something exciting. “Dad, I made a robot! Now, let me tell you what I did…” Our translations give the feeling that they announce a finished work, with subsequent details given to convey exactly what happened. There is no sense of continuing activity. No sense of the possibility that the account might not be complete. The end of the work, not its beginning, is prioritized in the translations.

Consider the English Standard Version of Genesis 1:1-3–

In the beginning, God created the heavens and the earth. The earth was without form and void, and darkness was over the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God was hovering over the face of the waters. And God said, “Let there be light,” and there was light

But compare this to the Jewish Publication Society translation of these same verses:

When God began to create heaven and earth—the earth being unformed and void, with darkness over the surface of the deep and a wind from God sweeping over the water—God said, “Let there be light”; and there was light.

And the Young’s Literal Translation, 3rd Revision:

In the beginning of God’s preparing the heavens and the earth—the earth hath existed waste and void, and darkness [is] on the face of the deep, and the Spirit of God fluttering on the face of the waters, and God Smith, ‘Let light be,’ and light is.

In the ESV (and NIV, NASB, RSV, NRSV, KJV, and most other modern English versions used by Protestants), the creation has a definite end. The period after “earth” makes it seem as if the rest of Genesis 1 is recounting an event only after it has been completely observed. However, look at the JPS version or the YLT version. These versions indicate that God’s work is beginning, but there is not a definite ending of the creating. We are watching something in progress. The omission of a period after “earth” allows the action to continue, and makes Genesis 1:1 an initiation of action, not a report of past events but of something continuing. Genesis 1:1 is an announcement that God is at work!

I was first made aware of these differences while reading Aviya Kushner’s The Grammar of God: a Journey Into the Words and Worlds of the Bible. Her book is a window into her encounter with the English Bible through which we are able to look on the differences between the Hebrew and the English, the ways in which culture and language obscure and illuminate the Scripture. Kushner writes that some of the punctuation and capitalization—none of which is present in the Hebrew—“makes everything look confident, definite… here, this is where it starts, this is where it ends.” On the other hand, the Hebrew is more flexible than the English, and can be “ambiguous, rich, lyrical, evocative” with the thoughts and actions flowing into one another.

When I am guided through other English translations by Kushner, I can’t help but notice how the Protestant translations I usually read make it seem, as Kushner observed, that the work stops—that it ends here. Creation is not ongoing; it is not connected to God’s continuing action in the world. The Hebrew is much more fluid and make clear that the beginning is connected to what God is doing next. Reflecting on all this makes me ask the question: Could it be possible that Genesis 1:1 is connected to what God is doing now? While Kushner is Jewish, not a Jesus follower, her observations lead me to remember what Jesus says about His Father in John 5:

For this reason the Jews began to persecute Jesus continually because He was doing these things on the Sabbath. But Jesus answered them, “My Father has been working until now [He has never ceased working], and I too am working.” -John 5:16-17, AMP

When Jesus says, “My Father is working until now,” we have to ask ourselves two questions. What is God doing? And When did God start working? I suggest that Jesus is hinting at the Creation in Genesis 1:1. Creation never definitely ended, and God is still working at it. While God saw that the world He made was, in fact, good, God is continuing His creative work today. God’s creative work is a constant theme of the Bible, and if we use the Hebrew as a clue, His creative work has never stopped. There is no period after “earth,” because God never stopped working.

One might ask: “What is God doing? What is He creating?” God is doing so much in us and around us once we understand His work has never stopped. For example, He is creating in us a clean heart:

Create in me a clean heart, O God, and renew a right spirit within me. -Psalm 51:10, ESV

and here as well:

A new heart I will give you, and a new spirit I will put within you; and I will take out of your flesh the heart of stone and give you a heart of flesh. And I will put my spirit within you, and cause you to walk in my statutes and be careful to observe my ordinances. -Ezekiel 36:26-27, RSV

He is working to fulfill his promises to those who have faith in Him, even if those promises involve a new creation:

As it is written, “I have made you the father of many nations”—in the presence of the God in whom he believed, who gives life to the dead and calls into existence the things that do not exist. -Romans 4:17, ESV

He is working in us to His pleasure:

for it is God who works in you, both to will and to work for his good pleasure. -Philippians 2:13, ESV

and He is working to create a nation for His Son:

And in the very place where it was said to them, “You are not my people,” they will be called “sons of the living God.” -Romans 9:26

As we can see from these and many more examples not listed here, God has never stopped creating. He was creating all the way through the Scriptures, and He is at work creating in our lives up until now. When we read Genesis 1:1 with a period after “earth,” we must take care to remember that God is still at work on what he started in the beginning. After all, the tension between completing and laboring is something we are intimately familiar with. For example, although the heavens and the earth have been brought forth, the first time we hear “it is finished” is when Jesus speaks from the cross. And even though Jesus has declared His work done, He still lives in us today to do the work of the Father and to build up His body. What are the ways He is at work in and around you? How will you join him in working to His pleasure?

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From Sacred Space to Public Grace

I was at a Christmas party with my kids this past holiday season and I was conflicted. The music was hot, the kids were eating well, and everyone was merry. Problem was, I wasn’t enjoying myself. I was trying to figure out why. I mean, I like rap, I like R&B, I like Bruno mars and Beyonce, but today I was unable to enjoy their music. Why? Because this party was in church.

I was trying to figure out why I couldn’t enjoy myself:
-Was I taking a holier than thou attitude?
-Was I being hypocritcal?
-Don’t I hear this music in other places, like the gym?
-Would Jesus even care? Would he be that offended?

Then it hit me: this is supposed to be a sacred space. Then I had to think to myself, what is the role of the sacred in our lives? Why do we distinguish the sacred from the everyday, quotidan, profane?

The sacred is a display of public grace.

What do we mean when we say something is a public grace? Grace is displayed:
-because the sacred indicates our sense of God’s existence
-because the sacred indicates our need for God’s presence
-the sacred displays our desire to know and experience God
-the sacred expresses our submission to His perfections
-the sacred indicates our awareness of sin and need for purity
-the sacred reinforces our hope in the transcendent

When we say that something is profane, on the other hand, we mean to prioritize the lowly over the heavenly, the immediate over the right, the tangible over transcendent. Profanity obscures God, while the sacred is meant to reveal Him.

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Spiritual Calisthenics

Have you ever tried to do something that flat-out humiliates you? Something you have absolutely no idea how to do and is so far beyond your abilities? Don’t stop because thats a perfect metaphor for the spiritual life.

Train yourself to be godly. For physical training is of some value, but godliness has value for all things, holding promise for both the present life and the life to come.

1 Timothy 4:7b-8, NIV84

In fact, that’s exactly how I feel–that hopelessness and embarrassment–about calisthenics skills. Most other physical pursuits I’ve tried have seemed attainable if only I’d put more effort in. I’d either already mastered the movements, or at least have been familiar enough with appropriate foundational movement patterns that I was able to do it in a small number of tries. Basketball, soccer, weightlifting, and marathon running are simply not that difficult. They are all composed of very basic movement patterns that literally everyone uses every day of their lives. The coordination takes only a modest amount of training and practice to become proficient. You just add weight or try to move faster.

Body weight calisthenics skills are something else altogether. Instead of standing on your feet and legs-your strongest body parts-you stand on your hands and arms-much less strong. Instead of using your legs to perform explosive movements with your arms, you use your arms to perform explosive pull-ups and muscle ups. Your anterior core (abs) become no less important than your posterior core and shoulders for stabilizing body movements and isometrics. And almost none of the skills-planche, levers, handstands, crosses, etc.-have equivalent movement patterns commonly used in everyday life. It is embarrassing trying to learn skills that your body has literally never had to perform.

If we are honest, this is exactly what the life of the Spirit is like. In our everyday lives-especially in the US-our survival depends on our ability to be materialistic and self seeking. We have no need or practical experience with (so-called) esoteric spiritual practices that place a sense of the transcendent over our sense of self. We have no practical or useful experience prioritizing our ability to anticipate spiritual movements. We literally have no understanding of how to perform miracles or communicate in the unseen world using unlearned languages. It is exceedingly difficult for us to fight demons because we have been told from birth that they don’t exist. Therefore we live under curses and demonic possession unaware. We do not expect healing because we believe healing only happens in stories. Like in a handstand, our world is turned upside down.

Unfortunately, while you don’t need a handstand to face reality, you do need faith. If you want to live in God’s world, you must have faith in Him and know what pleases Him. You must learn to recognize his activity and learn to join what He is doing.

What can we do when our experience is wholly inadequate to reality? Well, we have some tips from the physical challenges posed by calisthenics skills. Notice that there is some level of baseline strength that one must have in order to turn your world on its head. You cannot attempt a handstand if you cannot do a push-up. And there are disciplines that start from where one is to progress them to the more advanced activities. You may not be able to perform a front lever raise today, but a number of exercises performed consistently over time can help you bridge the gap.

While there is much about our spiritual lives that is beyond our ability to control, there are basic disciplines we should pursue in obedience while our spiritual strength grows. Do you pray? Do you read and meditate on Scripture? Do you cultivate a heart of worship? You cannot expect to perform miracles or even be other-centered if you don’t consistently engage these basics first! Work on the basics and make room, by faith, for God to move in your life.

Build your spiritual core.

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The Creative Power of Forgiveness

Akulacreative Color Palette
The irreversibility of action is one of the most profound truths of life. When we act, we interact with others from our position of human plurality to accomplish something more creative and powerful than we could ever accomplish on our own. Action is always an inter-action with others, and action is always resulting in an outcome that exceeds our own creativity and personal power. When we act, the consequences of our actions out live our selves. However, forgiveness can reverse the power of destructive action.

The inter-active, inter-personal reality of action is remarkable to consider. Because of our fallen nature and our lack of foreknowledge of future events, our actions can be creatively productive or creatively destructive. For example, we routinely see the creative power of action at work in politics. When DeRay McKesson asserts that #BlackLivesMatter, his actions are multiplied beyond his own power because others subject their personal will to the ideal that other Americans are willing to productively confront the structural devaluing of minority lives in our justice system. When President Donald J. Trump asserts that only he can #MakeAmericaGreatAgain, i.e., #MAGA, his actions are multiplied beyond his own power because others subject their personal will to the creative destruction of the American-dominated world order in favor of re-creating another domestic future.

We saw the irreversibility of action this past week in profoundly destructive and profoundly redeeming ways in Las Vegas. While the shooter may have had (yet unknown) plans effected in his own actions, the destructive power of his actions has been greatly multiplied beyond anything beyond his own power as the losses of life and health ripple through all of the families and communities affected. At the same time, his actions released the creatively redeeming actions of others who sacrificed themselves to protect others, risked their lives to keep the company of the dying, and provide immediate physical and spiritual relief to those who were suffering in the moment. While on the one hand, there was one irreversibly destructive act, on the other hand there were many irreversibly redeeming acts that negated the power of one’s rebellion against the sanctity of life.

In fact, action is so powerful that the only thing that can reverse or undo destructive acts is forgiveness. Forgiveness is the sole personal action that can release the actor and the one who is acted upon from the irreversible consequences of action. This is because forgiveness is so unexpected in the wake of actions with creatively destructive actions. Most of the time, when the circumstance demands forgiveness, it is because the hurt and pain caused by the original action is so deep that it creates a cycle of retribution in which the one acted upon is obligated to reciprocate the original action. Thus, the original action attains its destructive power. But forgiveness can have redemptive power, because it destroys the cycle of retribution while re-configuring the relation between the actor and the one acted upon. Ideally, forgiveness re-configures this relationship so that both parties can proceed as if the original act had never happened. In our human world, this is obviously not true since some of the artifacts of originally destructive acts cannot be reversed or restored (e.g., a man is paralyzed because he was struck by a drunk driver). However, future actions are no longer predetermined by the original act of destruction.

Have the events of the past week made you reconsider the meaning of life? The meaning of our actions? The power of forgiveness?

Peace and Blessings.

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Plantar Fasciitis Recovery: Hopefully the Last I’ll Post on This!

I’ll keep this short. It’s been 14 weeks since I started on this journey of plantar fasciitis. I had to drop my plans to run a marathon, and I may even need to change my half marathon plans. I’ve been able to savor the blessings of physical strength, learned to love swimming, and work through two calf strains. Along the way, I’ve hit personal bests in the deadlift, weighted pullup, and squat. Nonetheless, I’m ready to start running.

There is something wonderful about running. Especially in the fall and early spring. The cool crisp days on the trails are just what the body needs to escape the office and reset. And while weightlifting is much, much easier on the body (ask anyone who does both), there seems to be completely different physiological benefits to running (don’t ask me what they are).

Hopefully, my Monday post will be describing how wonderful it felt to run again!

Peace and blessing.

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Recovery Running #mondaymiles

I’m ready for this to be a regular part of my life again…

I’m at a stage in my life where every run I take is a recovery run. I’m coming back from plantar fasciitis (PF), and it really tests my resolve to run.

First off, I must say that since I’ve been lifting more and my cardio based on swimming, folks have been asking me how often I work out. That is somewhat gratifying, to say the very least. When I was running only, no one ever stopped me to ask any such questions. Even my parents commented on the new muscular look I must be wearing. I was revising my training plan today to accommodate a half marathon in 9 weeks, and I was asking myself “do I really want to run that much and risk losing that much muscle?

Second, since my cardio fitness has come exclusively from walking (during my commute, not as a workout) and from swimming, running is pretty difficult still. It makes me ask myself whether I’m willing to train through some very sluggish days ahead to get to half-marathon fitness.

Third, my plantar fasciitis. Even though I took 9 weeks off to let it heal some, it is not yet completely healed in the sense of feeling like my non-injured foot. Running is not so much the problem, it’s basically all the other times when my foot has a chance to stiffen up. And although the foot is not painful during workouts, it takes a lot of disciplined exercise just to make sure that it remains pain-free.

All this said, I am going to push through. Running is not forever. Training and strength are gifts from God. I am going to enjoy it fully. Plus, my running helps me address everything else I’m engaged in. There’s something about hitting the trails or the roads, especially in cool or almost cold fall weather, that clears your mind and prepares your heart for work [and worship??].

Where will you hit the trails today?

 

PS. Some PF Tips—I don’t want to leave this post without giving a plantar fasciitis tip, so here it is. I’ve been taping my foot before I run. The best thing I can compare it to is taping your ankles. If you’ve sprained an ankle, and you know what it’s like to come back from that, you know that the tape helps you compete even if it will be some unpredictable amount of time before the ankle is 100% again. That’s what it feels like with taping PF. It works! But how long will it take for my foot to be strong again? There are many low-dye taping methods, but the most important thing for me has been to not tape the metatarsals’ anchor strap around the top of the foot. Anchor the strip only from side to side. If you can, use waterproof tape as it flexes some to help support without chafing. Whatever you do, do not use kinesio tape. KT tape did not work for me for PF. Also, I’ve been taking my easy runs in Saucony Guide 10’s. I do not run in my Pegasus 33s since I feel they are a little too unstable. I use those only for walking, but the Saucony’s have been very good on the run.

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Plantar Fasciitis Recovery Update–Good to Go! (Hopefully)

Today, I wanted to culminate my plantar fasciitis posts by letting everyone know that I think I’m good to go!

Well, I hope I’m good to go. It’s been 9 weeks since I last ran, and so I’m going to test it out tomorrow to see how it responds. This week, I have started lower body weightlifting again, and the one lift I’ve added back into my routine is the front squat. I went up to 245# today for triples, so not very heavy. My foot didn’t hurt throughout the day, and the only soreness is on the outsides of the foot where my weight has been shifting throughout the 9 weeks. So, I’m a bit nervous, but I’m excited to test it out tomorrow.

One other thing I’ve noticed is that footwear makes a big difference. I’ve been walking around almost nonstop in my Nike Zoom Pegasus 33’s, even inside, unless I get a bit skittish about wearing shoes I’ve worn pretty much everywhere else inside my house. Then I’m wearing my Adidas Sequence 9’s, which I’ve not worn outside (except to put kids in the car) yet. I can wear my Cole Haan GrandOS shoes with my SuperFeet inserts, but my Nike Pegasus 33’s with the SuperFeet Insoles are by far the most comfortable combination. So anyone with non-chronic PF may want to try certainly the SuperFeet, but also the Pegasus 33’s. Don’t wear the Pegasus without some inserts or additional support, however, since the Pegasus is not very supportive at all. Try the Asics Gel Nimbus if you want a neutral shoe that has a bit more support. I thoroughly enjoyed those shoes, and would still run in them if they weren’t completely worn down. In fact, if I were to do it from scratch today, I’d probably rotate the Gel Nimbus and the Pegasus 33’s (of course with my SuperFeet) as my training combination. I’m not serious enough for racing flats…

If you’re struggling with plantar fasciitis, and it just won’t go away, my advice to you is to rest. Before I took 9 weeks off of running, I had been dealing with PF from April 9th through July 9th or so. I would let it rest just enough to not hurt through the day, and then I’d run on it and it would hurt for two or three days. I’d go on and off like this until I tried to run a 60-minute fartlek workout in late June and it felt like something popped. I thought I’d broken something or torn a foot muscle and scheduled a doctor’s appointment, only to have a diagnosis of PF confirmed by cortisone injection. That acute injury probably saved my running career, certainly in the near-term. If I had kept on running on it, it might have turned into a chronic PF case. So, if you don’t have money for doctors, etc.., my advice to you is to bite the bullet and rest. If you can see a doctor, go get a cortisone shot and rest. Don’t run on it for at least 6 weeks. Go swim, tackle some weightlifting or calisthenics goals, catch up on reading or family/friends time, gain some weight (not too much) and let the rest of your body recover as well. Have the discipline to shut it down and alter your race plans. From what I’ve read, rest is the only thing that works for most people, and if you’ve gotten PF from running, you’ve probably got an acute case that will respond to rest. So make sure you rest. Don’t go looking for a magic cure or secret that will help you recover fast. There is no such thing, and people who recover instantly have a unique natural history with the disease.

I’m so excited to get back running, even if I have gotten into a sort of rhythm with swimming. I bless God for recovery, and I am more passionate about staying fit than I was before. This injury has taught me that your physical strength and health is not a blessing to take lightly, and that you should enjoy it while you can.

Peace and Blessings. 

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Plantar Fasciitis Recovery, Week 5, Day 6

This past week has seen very little working out, quite a lot of rest, and quite a lot of celebration and retreat. While my foot is not perfect, I’ll be a bit confused if I won’t be able to resume my running after I meet the doctor this week. 

However, I am very thankful for the experiences that have led me away from my training momentarily. First off, we bought a car–a 2014 Ford Focus–and I love every bit about how it drives. Second, our family friends–really, family to Lucine–celebrated a daughter’s wedding. It was one of the best weddings I’ve been at in a couple years. Third, I attended the InterVarsity Northeast Faculty Conference at the University of Rhode Island in Kingston, RI. This meeting was a great blessing and encouragement to my soul. So while I miss the rhythm of dropping my kids off, training, then working, I have been greatly blessed by the events that have interrupted my normal schedule.

The rest, however, has been great for my foot. It doesn’t hurt as much anymore, even though I can still “feel” it, if that makes any sense. It is a bit stiff, even if it doesn’t hurt when I wake up in the morning. I’ve also been careful to be somewhat gentle with it. When I begin training, I won’t be treating it gently–except when I’m not running.

No additional updates. I’ll check back in after I see the doc this week!

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Do we choose God, or has He chosen us?

Last week, we attended an Assemblies of God church called Trinity Life here in North Baltimore. I took a moment to read a bit about the Assemblies of God, with a specific emphasis on church doctrine. More specifically, I wanted to know if the church was Reformed in its theology, or if not, how much of the Reformed doctrine they reject.

When I say that I am concerned about Reformed theology, I am not necessarily talking about things like the Council on Biblical Manhood and Womanhood, and I am not necessarily talking about conforming to those things taught by The Gospel Coalition or Desiring God. While much of my own life has been greatly influenced by the books and sermons published by pastors who are members of these groups, there are several teachings they articulate to which I do not subscribe. However, I generally agree with them when it comes to the basic doctrines of Reformed theology: TULIP-

Total Depravity [addressing the nature of man]

Unconditional Election [addressing the Sovereign action of God in salvation]

Limited Atonement [addressing the efficacy of the death and atonement of Christ]

Irresistible Grace [addressing the conviction of the Holy Spirit]

Perseverance of the Saints [addressing eternal security of those who are in Christ]

The only reason I qualify my agreement with the term “generally” is because I do believe that the Bible presents all of these essential truths as antinomies. For example, it is clear that the nature of man is totally depraved–meaning that man rejects the nature, personality, and law of God. Nonetheless, it is clear from what we can observe and what we know about man being formed in the image of God that man can do some things that are good, from our perspective. Therefore, we see that while man does not seek for God, the life we experience is not completely negative in every aspect. Nonetheless, because men fundamentally reject God, we have not only the potential for immense good, but immense evil.

The antinomies that become more important for sorting through the different varieties of Christian theology are the antinomies in which the free will of man is set in contradiction to the sovereign will of God. This antinomy bears most on the doctrines of unconditional election, irresistible grace, and perseverance of the saints. Some Christians believe that election is not unconditional; that is, the Holy Spirit enables the sinner to become aware that there is a choice between God and their ways, but that the sinner can continue in their ways after this awareness. Because election depends, then, on the sinner responding positively to God’s invitation, grace is, by definition, not irresistible and perseverance is not guaranteed. At the same time, the atonement is unlimited because it is applied to all but effective only for those who do not reject it. From an outward, practical perspective, the lives that both types of Christians live might look identical, but what is affirmed as truth about God is quite different.

While the Reformed theology states that man does not have unconditional free will, because man cannot choose God in his sinful nature, there are Christian theologies who believe that man can choose God as an exercise of will as described above. These branches are sometimes called Arminian, and the Assemblies of God denomination happens to be an Arminian branch. While I believe that the Scripture more strongly affirms the Reformed positions, there are very clearly Scripture passages that affirm both–hence the antinomy.

While I enjoyed my visit, I am a bit nervous about attending a church that would find affirmation of these Reformed positions to be anti-Scriptural. This is besides the other Pentecostal positions some Assemblies affirm. Among these, the most uncomfortable being that speaking in tongues is the initial evidence of authentic conversion. But, I’m interested in waiting and watching to see how things shake out. As you’ll notice, I haven’t listed all of the Scriptures and passages used on both sides. I’m not sure that I wanted to do more than think through some of the concerns I have.

What do you think? Can man choose God, or does God move first?

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Joining the #mondaymiles crowd, and PF Week 4, Day 1 Update

I will be joining all those who use the #mondaymiles hashtag to remind me to journal my running and training exploits. I’ll post my #mondaymiles on Monday evenings after I put my kids to sleep but before I turn in for the night. This should be between 9:30 and 11:00pm most nights.

I’m a bit late for the first one, so let me start with a plantar fasciitis (PF) update. Today I visited the podiatrist’s office for a follow-up and a consultation. It’s not technically a consultation, but my wife now has me in the habit of making sure I bring questions to my doctor’s appointments, so I had a few questions I wanted to ask about my progress.

To cut to the chase, although I haven’t run in four weeks, he wanted me to have another cortisone shot and take at least two more weeks rest. He doesn’t believe I’ll require another cortisone shot, and he believes I’m doing well on the recovery. Since I have an acute case of plantar fasciitis (thank God!), there is some inflammation involved in mine (confirmed since the prior cortisone shot relieved any pain I felt almost immediately), and he was able to feel some differences in the swelling and warmth when comparing both of my heels. And with the reading that I’ve done myself, I’m willing to go along with his judgment (not that I have a choice). So it looks like this plantar fasciitis layoff will be 6 weeks, at a minimum from running. 

There is a lot to be thankful for, though. First off, I’m thankful for all of the runners, athletes, trainers, coaches, and medical professionals who write blogs and layperson resources about this condition. I would almost certainly have done something even more stupid than waiting three months to see a doctor about this. (Something like get the cortisone shot and continue training as planned.) I’m happy that it is an acute case and not a chronic case. The treatment and recovery timelines are totally different between the two types of PF. I’m thankful for my insurance. Even though it doesn’t cover orthotics, it does cover my appointments and so I am able to see the doctor. And I’m thankful that I have a gym membership that I can use to continue training even though I can’t run. For me, physical activity is critical to maintaining my overall health, and I count it as part of my workday because otherwise I’d probably be relying on some other form of medical intervention to maintain. So I am blessed to have the gym membership to LA Fitness. And I am blessed to have health and strength. 

This week,  I’m going to try to balance a desire to push myself in the gym with the reality that I don’t have that much time to devote to training. Besides, it can be a bit redundant to do pull-ups, pushups, and swim laps day in, day out. Also, whenever you do something daily, whatever it is, it can be hard to remember that consistency is the key. Moderating the intensity can be key to being consistent. But I’m starting to get bored, and I want to see how much I can progress my pull-ups, especially. I’m not necessarily doing the Armstrong plan, but I haven’t given up on my 20 pull-ups goal.

Be blessed everyone. See you next week Monday.

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