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Category: Christianity

What Does The Baptism of Christ Mean?

Image sources: DesiringGod.org, Bonnellart.com. Artist: Daniel Bonnell

I was reading my Bible plan on youversion the other day when it led me to the baptism of Christ. I’d never thought much of the event before, but this time it stood out.

Why did Jesus submit to baptism? There are two parts to this answer we should explore: the role of baptism in Jewish life; and what baptism seems to represent in the New Testament Scripture. We will look only at the second for now.

Baptism represents several things. I believe that baptism is representative of repentance from sin, and it prepares our souls for public affiliation with Christ. But why would Christ himself need to be baptized? Is he not sinless? Is he not our master, the one by whom we are named? What is the significance of his act?

While thinking about this and reading a couple articles about this passage, I think that baptism is representative of work that is public and work that is private. Or maybe I’m more correct to say that Christ’s baptism reflected both private and public reality simultaneously. More than this, it referred to Christ’s present and future work, simultaneously.

In Matthew when Jesus says that his baptism fulfills all righteousness, that is a present reality. The reality of the death of Christ is already present to him and he is already working in the task he has been prepared for. It is like a war. When we speak of World War II, or Haiti’s War of Independence, we can think of it as a series of battles, but it is all one event historically. All of these events come together as a unified whole. This is how God sees the work of Christ. In submitting to baptism, Christ also indicates-privately since no one else has knowledge of the event at the time-his obedience to the Father’s plan for redemption of man. This is why He says He is well pleased with His Son. His Son has accepted the cross, and descending and ascending into and from the waters symbolizes his descent to and resurrection from death on the cross.

It is public because everyone witnesses these events. The completion and fulfillment of God’s plan is announced. But it is also indicative of future work. It points in human time to a future reality that will be fulfilled 3.5 years later at the conclusion of his public ministry. The baptism is a symbol that promises the completion of a future reality.

Therefore, the baptism is important because it is yet another testimony of God’s faithfulness to Himself and His promises. To Him, He has already completed His work in you, and your salvation and glorification is one complete and unified event. But he is also promising the fulfillment of a future reality. That you will be presented along with His Son faultless before the throne. It is private because your baptism indicates your obedient acceptance and participation in His plan. But it is public because you declare your identification with Christ in His death, burial, and resurrection.

Present and future, public and private.

Peace and blessings.

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Do we choose God, or has He chosen us?

Last week, we attended an Assemblies of God church called Trinity Life here in North Baltimore. I took a moment to read a bit about the Assemblies of God, with a specific emphasis on church doctrine. More specifically, I wanted to know if the church was Reformed in its theology, or if not, how much of the Reformed doctrine they reject.

When I say that I am concerned about Reformed theology, I am not necessarily talking about things like the Council on Biblical Manhood and Womanhood, and I am not necessarily talking about conforming to those things taught by The Gospel Coalition or Desiring God. While much of my own life has been greatly influenced by the books and sermons published by pastors who are members of these groups, there are several teachings they articulate to which I do not subscribe. However, I generally agree with them when it comes to the basic doctrines of Reformed theology: TULIP-

Total Depravity [addressing the nature of man]

Unconditional Election [addressing the Sovereign action of God in salvation]

Limited Atonement [addressing the efficacy of the death and atonement of Christ]

Irresistible Grace [addressing the conviction of the Holy Spirit]

Perseverance of the Saints [addressing eternal security of those who are in Christ]

The only reason I qualify my agreement with the term “generally” is because I do believe that the Bible presents all of these essential truths as antinomies. For example, it is clear that the nature of man is totally depraved–meaning that man rejects the nature, personality, and law of God. Nonetheless, it is clear from what we can observe and what we know about man being formed in the image of God that man can do some things that are good, from our perspective. Therefore, we see that while man does not seek for God, the life we experience is not completely negative in every aspect. Nonetheless, because men fundamentally reject God, we have not only the potential for immense good, but immense evil.

The antinomies that become more important for sorting through the different varieties of Christian theology are the antinomies in which the free will of man is set in contradiction to the sovereign will of God. This antinomy bears most on the doctrines of unconditional election, irresistible grace, and perseverance of the saints. Some Christians believe that election is not unconditional; that is, the Holy Spirit enables the sinner to become aware that there is a choice between God and their ways, but that the sinner can continue in their ways after this awareness. Because election depends, then, on the sinner responding positively to God’s invitation, grace is, by definition, not irresistible and perseverance is not guaranteed. At the same time, the atonement is unlimited because it is applied to all but effective only for those who do not reject it. From an outward, practical perspective, the lives that both types of Christians live might look identical, but what is affirmed as truth about God is quite different.

While the Reformed theology states that man does not have unconditional free will, because man cannot choose God in his sinful nature, there are Christian theologies who believe that man can choose God as an exercise of will as described above. These branches are sometimes called Arminian, and the Assemblies of God denomination happens to be an Arminian branch. While I believe that the Scripture more strongly affirms the Reformed positions, there are very clearly Scripture passages that affirm both–hence the antinomy.

While I enjoyed my visit, I am a bit nervous about attending a church that would find affirmation of these Reformed positions to be anti-Scriptural. This is besides the other Pentecostal positions some Assemblies affirm. Among these, the most uncomfortable being that speaking in tongues is the initial evidence of authentic conversion. But, I’m interested in waiting and watching to see how things shake out. As you’ll notice, I haven’t listed all of the Scriptures and passages used on both sides. I’m not sure that I wanted to do more than think through some of the concerns I have.

What do you think? Can man choose God, or does God move first?

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Life Together: The Classic Exploration of Christian Community

It is grace, nothing but grace, that we are allowed to live in community with Christian brethren.

Let me say that this statement contains a useful summary of what Dietrich Bonhoeffer believes to be the essence of Christian life, lived for the purpose of building up others in Christ. Dietrich Bonhoeffer writes this in the first chapter of his book, Life Together, which crystallizes his theology of Christian community. As time permits, I will try to share a few reflections from this book that I believe are encouraging. I have finished reading the book for some time, but it is difficult to write a review so I will share a few thoughts over the next week or two as I have opportunity. Let us start by discussing the quote above.

We see his emphasis on grace. If you have read more than one paragraph of Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s writing–in most cases even only one paragraph–you will know that Bonhoeffer believes that the grace of God in Christ is the reason for living. It is the rationale and motivation of our ethics. It is the breath of life and the substance of what we call death. To Bonhoeffer, grace is everything, and so it is fitting that this quote from his book, Life Together, begins with grace.

We see that his focus on grace yields to his acknowledgment that God allows us to live in community with other Christians. I’ve written recently about how much I am disappointed and dissatisfied by church. I think that Bonhoeffer, even if he saw exactly the same data that I experience, he would conclude that even the church experiences that I have had are a supreme gift of grace that must prompt a response of praise and gratitude and not one of self-righteous complaint. When Bonhoeffer wrote this book–one of his last–he was writing as a pastor who was a leader of a non-sanctioned non-denominational seminary in Germany during the Third Reich. Communities of authentic Christianity were not common. So he wrote this with the understanding that the enjoyment of Christian community for many could be abridged at any moment by the governing authorities. Thus, not only is it grace, but it is a privilege if God calls you to live in Christian community with others. If He calls you to respond to Truth in Christ, He does so without respect for your external circumstances. Many are called to labor alone. That is not my call in Christ, thank God. He allows me to live in community with other Christians.

And this brings us to the third thing we see here: community. If we are in Christ, our lives are not our own. Bonhoeffer understood that our lives are lived in Christ, through Christ, expressly for others and not for ourselves. To me, this truth is tricky because, of course, it is only possible for me to be self-aware, physiologically. I can only be aware of things that are revealed to me, speaking from what I understand of our cognitive processes. However, in Christ, our lives are not our own. Starting in my own household, since I am married my body belongs to my wife and not to myself. The desires of my children often come before my own, discipline notwithstanding. Choices that I can make, even if I do want to satisfy my own desires, are circumscribed by household resources that do not belong to me but to my household as a unit. And this is before I leave my doors. If I read the Scripture, yes I am transformed but my transformation affects my brothers and sisters. And much about my spiritual journey cannot be accomplished if I am isolated from my brothers and sisters. How can I experience grace if I never need to ask for forgiveness? How can I experience kindness if I am never put in a position to rely on the sovereign choices of others? I cannot develop self-control or patience if I am never subject to the will of another. I cannot exercise love or be loved if I am not in any relationships. It quickly becomes clear that what Christians call the fruit of the Spirit cannot be cultivated outside of community. It also becomes clear that these fruit are not produced for our own sustenance, but for the sustenance of the entire body.

How is God calling to you to live for the Body? In what ways can you thank God for the Christian communities around you?

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run the race to win

What does it mean to “run in such a way as to get the prize”? (1 Corinthians 9:24-27)

Whatever it means, it is not just talking about the race. While the race is the focus and the ultimate goal of one’s training and attention, the race is simply the part of the athlete’s life that is seen by all. The race is much more about the preparation coming beforehand.

Ever since I’ve started taking up distance running as an amateur pursuit, and not just as an accessory to basketball and soccer training, I’ve been struck by how much my race times are predictable once I take a look back at my training log. There is so much truth to this that if I’d truly understood this in high school, I’d have been a much different–and much better–track and field athlete. (I would have been an excellent 300m/400m hurdler, or a decent 200m sprinter). This is because I’d have taken much more care to steward my training and my body very carefully. The goal would be the peak at the conference and regional championships (as a sophomore or junior) or regional and state championships (as a junior or senior). Every moment before then would be taken in light of the ultimate goal of winning one of these races.

In the middle distance events, I found that there is still much more variability than in distances exceeding 10k. Between 1500 to 10,000m, there is a delicate balance between tactics and talent that reveals what is in the heart of the most talented runners. If you are one who is head and shoulders above the rest of the field–and believe that is true–then you can run a fast, honest pace from the gun. This reminds me of Genzebe Dibaba and Sifan Hassan racing to break the world record at 5000m. They knew the race was among only two runners, and from the gun ran with such confident assurance. However, when the best racers equivocate, it leaves room for the less talented runners to steal a victory. As much as I love Leo Manzano, he has no business with an Olympic bronze medal at 1500m. In this case, the less talented runners race with grit and faith, while the more talented runners race with doubt and fear. At its essence, this is what makes a tactical race fun to watch–despite the often pedestrian paces.

For the longer distances, however, it is very much like the sprints. Everyone knows the one or two individuals who will have a real shot at winning. This is because there is very, very little room for error. While these races are given somewhat to tactics, they are principally determined by the condition of the physiological systems of the racers. Therefore, the training is an accurate indicator of the fitness and race capability of the racers. For sprints and distance events exceeding 10 miles, there is very little left to chance barring injury or other accident.

This is where we return to the statement above: “run in such a way as to get the prize.” You cannot run to get the price starting with the gun. The racing begins in the training so that the athlete is transformed into one who is able to get the prize. Your physiological systems must be different when the gun goes off than they were when you started training towards the event. World class athletes know this, and approach their training with the same methodical precision as a world class researcher. While the effort is not the same in each session, every session has a purpose. Each moment has a place in the athlete’s teleological transformation. This is how our lives with God should be viewed. Each moment is not the same. However, we must approach each of our days with God intending to be transformed into one who thinks His thoughts and knows His ways. We do not run the race once we enter His presence, because that is the end, the peak, not the race itself. The race is to be transformed into Christ’s likeness by having our minds renewed daily through interaction with Him, His Word, and His people.

We must run the race so as to win the prize. How will you run your race for the glory of God today?

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What’s behind the door?

Imagine that you were standing in front of a door that had everything you have ever desired or wanted behind it. If you were told you could have everything behind the door, would you be able to open it?

This is one of the illustrations James K.A. Smith uses when he tries to convince us that we are fundamentally lovers, not thinkers. In his lecture “You Are What You Love,” he makes a compelling case that we are creatures of desire. The narratives that arouse the most desire in us are the ones that direct our thoughts and actions. These desires are so deep that we are not always aware of them. So, while we know what we should say when someone asks us what we should desire, chances are that we love something altogether different. For most people, this should be a harrowing idea.

I’m not sure I would have the courage to open the door. 

I know what I should say when someone asks me what I love. I love the Lord Jesus Christ and want to see Him glorified. I love my wife and my kids and want to give selflessly to them. I love other people and want to see their lives improved. But when I actually reflect on what my actions say about who I love, I love myself. I want to be king over my life, unconditionally. I want my kids to do what I say as soon as I say it. I want my wife to do what I want. I want to be served and not to serve anyone else.

In light of Christ’s commands, I don’t want to open that door. Especially not in front of Him.

I know that my inner life needs to be renovated and re-created. I want my desires to truly be re-made before I come to see Him. If I can be honest, the thought of divine judgment is terrifying because I know that I would hesitate to open that door.

It’s a good thing that God knows we would hesitate. James K.A. Smith paraphrases an important Biblical command by saying “The beginning of all wisdom is to know we don’t desire God.” At this point, it is clear to us that we cannot do this on our own–we need the Holy Sprit’s intervention. We need Him to help us imitate the desires of Christ. Ultimately, this is the goal of Christian discipleship, that our desires would be the same as those of the Lord Jesus Christ. The loves that drive us would be the same as His loves. Our deepest unconscious desires would glorify Him by second-nature.

While I would be absolutely terrified to open the door today, the song “Just Want You” by Travis Greene is my prayer today. Would you make it yours?

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Why is it so hard to find a church? The old wine is good…

christmas holly decoration

The definition of insanity is doing the same thing, but expecting different results. Jesus puts it this way:

Then the disciples of John came to him, saying, “Why do we and the Pharisees fast, but your disciples do not fast?” And Jesus said to them, “Can the wedding guests mourn as long as the bridegroom is with them? The days will come when the bridegroom is taken away from them, and then they will fast. No one puts a piece of unshrunk cloth on an old garment,for the patch tears away from the garment, and a worse tear is made. Neither is new wine put into old wineskins. If it is, the skins burst and the wine is spilled and the skins are destroyed.But new wine is put into fresh wineskins, and so both are preserved.” [Matthew 9:14-17, ESV]

Some may read this passage and say that it clearly addresses fasting. Fair enough. But I think it is a very clear statement that it would be insane for followers of Jesus to expect him to fit into their established traditions. Perhaps one might see this a bit more clearly in his words here:

He also told them a parable: “No one tears a piece from a new garment and puts it on an old garment. If he does, he will tear the new, and the piece from the new will not match the old. And no one puts new wine into old wineskins. If he does, the new wine will burst the skins and it will be spilled, and the skins will be destroyed. But new wine must be put into fresh wineskins. And no one after drinking old wine desires new, for he says, ‘The old is good.’” [Luke 5:36-39, ESV]

Do you see that statement at the end? “And no one after drinking old wine desires new, for he says, ‘The old is good.'”

I think this statement explains why we see so much division in conservative, Evangelical Christian churches in the United States. We have spent so much time drinking old wine–familiarity with our socio-economic classes, familiarity with our racial communities, familiarity with styles of preaching and teaching, familiarity with culture–that most of us will not even attempt to taste the new wine.

For those of us who do, the answer is often “The old is good.”

I feel these words viscerally because I have been searching for a church for a bit over a year now. It has been the hardest and most frustrating experience of my life. It has gotten to a point where I am very seriously considering not attending church services on Sundays at all, but just reading my Bible through the week and meeting my men’s Bible study on Saturdays.

Slowing down to think about it, I think that my frustration is caused by my insanity. Consider this. I was looking at the website of a local church that is a 20 minute casual walk from my house, and on their blog is a post titled “A Small Church.” In that post I could not believe what I found. Some advice on finding a church from Eugene Peterson.

Go to the closest church where you live and the smallest. After six months, if it isn’t working, go find the next smallest church.

Now, I live in between three neighborhoods in Baltimore City called Roland Park, Guilford, and Homeland. I grew up in the Black Baptist Church. I believe it is very likely that I will not find this experience at the church who posted this blog, because not only is it a different denomination, but it is rooted in the community where I live. So, by Christ’s definition, I am completely unwilling to consider it because it doesn’t match the traditions and culture I have become comfortable with.

On the one hand, I could justify myself in all of this by explaining race issues in the church, explaining how I want my children to grow up and experience what I experienced, how there are relatively few places where I don’t have to apologize for being myself. On the other hand, could God be calling me and my family to taste new wine?

In my mind, I have this idea that most people used to attend neighborhood churches. There wasn’t much thought put into selecting a church because you went to the closest church that spoke your language and fit your denomination. It seems to me that there were several practical limitations that made this an accurate description of most Christians’ church communities until relatively recently. A number of technical advances have made the dilemma I am facing somewhat new.

If I can describe my challenge in two words, consumer Christianity, then I’ll say that my own consumer Christianity is only possible because of technology. I can Google churches on the internet and listen to sermons or look at pictures of the congregation. I can look at maps to see the locations. I have a car that allows me to drive a relatively great distance in a relatively short period of time. I can read reviews of the church before I attend. And, unique to the American/Western context, I am not constrained by the traditions of any denomination. All of these factors have made the church, in my opinion and experience, radically pluralistic. It’s as if Romans 1 has become true for us in our church experience. God has given us over to consumer Christianity.

All of this to say, I’m afraid of trying something new. I’m afraid of going to the church that is in the community where I live. I’m afraid of losing my identity by attending that church. I’m also afraid of preventing my children from developing an African American community. I’ve tasted the old wine, and it is good.

Am I willing to taste His wine?

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Love Redeems: Reflections on Crime and Punishment

It’s been a while since I’ve had a chance to read fiction, and I like to at least read one every few months to make sure that my heart remains full and refreshed. I read plenty of narrative prose for my research and day job, and I read plenty of prose for learning about Christ and teaching in my church. While I love the beauty of well-written, technical, narrative prose, my heart remains detached from the details of those documents. I cannot remain detached from the fiction that I read.

My latest book was Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky. This was, quite possibly, the best book that I have ever read. For me, the power of the book is in its communicating the power of love to redeem and transform even the most guilty conscience.

In my opinion, this book, like Anna Karenina, was much more about a supporting cast member, Sonechka, than the main character, Rodya. While the book deals mainly with the acts and thoughts of Rodya, his ideas about the doctrine of man from the agnostic/atheistic and theistic/Christian perspectives, social structure and hierarchy, guilt and the identity of man, the book makes its main statements through the actions of Sonechka.

As a Christian, I find Sonechka’s place in the story remarkable. Having become a prostitute to support her family in spite of her father’s alcoholism and depression, her lower caste and occupation makes her essentially untouchable in the contemporary Russian society. Nonetheless, her nobility is demonstrated in her inability to remain indifferent when confronted with the suffering of her family. Rodya rightly sees this aspect of her character, and even appraises her character much more highly than the higher caste Luzhin, engaged to his sister. Luzhin has the higher social position and resource, but he is of much lower character, treating his future mother-in-law and fiancé with great contempt.

At the end of the book, Sonechka is vindicated as we witness the closing scene between Rodya and Sonechka. Having been sent to Siberia for his murder, Rodya has recovered from a sickness and now has the chance to receive Sonechka after an illness of her own. During this time, it becomes clear to him how much he loves her and is indebted to her reckless companionship and faith in his future redemption. We are told at the end of the book that it is her tireless love that convinces Rodya to pursue life, spurning guilt’s heavy weight on his conscience and giving him a taste of the sweetness of life. He is compared to Lazarus, in my opinion. Just as Lazarus is resurrected at the word of Jesus, the redemption of God endures beyond the greatest guilt that can be upon any man or woman. Sonechka clearly believes this, as we see from her reading of this story with Rodya when he visits her after his sister spurns Luzhin, and this story is in the background of the final third of the book as we approach Rodya’s confession.

Crime and Punishment closes with a statement of newness of life for Rodya, a statement of renewal and regeneration. There’s so much more in this that could be explored–the use of a broken vessel to bring life to a guilty soul; the inability to escape one’s own guilt; the fact that our deeds and desires carry us along despite our desire to master them. But I leave the exploration of these topics to my fellow reader.

But here begins a new account, the account of a man’s gradual renewal, the account of his gradual regeneration, his gradual transition from one world to another, his acquaintance with a new, hitherto completely unknown reality. It might make the subject of a new story–but our present story is ended.

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Count Not Just the Cost, But Also The Worth

We have been writing Lenten devotionals in our church’s Foreign Missions Ministry. This post was originally written to be published on our minstry’s blog, but it was not required. I think that I’d like to share it with you all on my personal blog, so here goes…

Today’s Scripture Focus: Luke 14:28-33

“Suppose one of you wants to build a tower. Won’t you first sit down and estimate the cost to see if you have enough money to complete it?    For if you lay the foundation and are not able to finish it, everyone who sees it will ridicule you,    saying, ‘This person began to build and wasn’t able to finish.’ “Or suppose a king is about to go to war against another king. Won’t he first sit down and consider whether he is able with ten thousand men to oppose the one coming against him with twenty thousand?    If he is not able, he will send a delegation while the other is still a long way off and will ask for terms of peace.    In the same way, those of you who do not give up everything you have cannot be my disciples.”

During my discipleship class this week, we were discussing this passage. If you turn to Luke 14 in your Bible, and start reading from verse 25, you will see that Jesus had been followed by very large crowds. Seeing the condition of their (and our) hearts, He says to them “If anyone comes to me and does not hate father and mother, wife and children, brothers and sisters—yes, even their own life—such a person cannot be my disciple.    And whoever does not carry their cross and follow me cannot be my disciple.” These are probably among the most famous words in the Bible. Jesus is clearly telling us that it will cost us everything to follow Him.

But this time, reading this passage, I couldn’t help feeling that we were missing something.

I think that Jesus knew we’d miss the point, so He uses a parable to explain why it is that it is worth giving up everything.  This pair of parables is our Scripture focus today.  First, Jesus compares to a builder who “estimates the cost” of his building and evaluates the plans that have been established. Second, Jesus compares to a king who is about to go to war and considers “whether he is able with ten thousand men to oppose the one coming against him with twenty thousand.” This is strikingly different than what Jesus says above in that we must “hate father and mother, wife and children, brothers and sisters…” How does the “hate” meet up with “estimate the cost.”

I believe Jesus uses these parables to show us that our focus should not be on what we are losing, but what we are gaining! The point is not to fail to build the house, but to make sure your secure the mortgage before you start! The point is not to stay home from war, but to make sure you have 20,000 troops or alliances that will protect you!

So, what am I saying. Why does God tell us count the cost? Because we are to clearly see that God’s life, and life with God is much more valuable than anything that we currently have.  This is the goal. And anything less than life with God is like building on a foundation without securing the mortgage. Living this life without rebirth in Jesus is like us in our will and wisdom (10,000 men) going up against God and His holiness in eternity (20,000 men).  The foolishness of this task is just as clear as the folly shown by the foolish builder or the foolish king. This foolishness is compounded by the fact that the solution is simple in both cases.  Consider buying a home: very few of us have the tens or hundreds of thousands of dollars required to build a home. However, the value of home ownership for building wealth is worth so much to many people in our culture that we see clearly the advantage of committing to a debt greater than a substantial part of our financial worth in order to pursue the vision of homeownership. While many of us will spend the majority of our working adult lives paying down our mortgages, it is not seen as a sacrifice at all.  Consider the king going to war. If one can’t defeat his adversary, he goes to him and makes terms of peace. One will have to give up his autonomy and live under the King’s authority, but it is infinitely worth it. If we make peace with God, we will be part of His Kingdom!

Of course, to make peace with God, we must give up everything that we have (v. 33). But, in view of the alternatives, this is not a sacrifice at all! We are the opposing king who has just been made an ally in the most powerful kingdom in all eternity!

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Bring Him What You Have

[I originally posted these thoughts on my running blog. I’m sharing them here a couple weeks later.]

Yesterday I was reading in Matthew and came to the Scripture in which Jesus is walking on water out to the disciples near Genessaret. But just before that, he had been teaching all day and felt compassion on his students whom had not eaten all day.

At that point, he tells his disciples, feed the people. They respond out of what they don’t have. In response to their incredulity, he says, bring me what you have: five loaves and two fish. Jesus then gives thanks for what they do have, and he proceeds to feed the people with it.

Then it dawned on me. God says to us to bring him what we have, give thanks for what we have, and watch him work with it. He works with what you’ve got, not your worries about what you don’t.

It’s important we catch this lesson and trust him with our resources.

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Join me in supporting @WorldRelief at the 2012 #BaltimoreMarathon. #standwiththevulnerable

As some of you may know, I am in training for the Baltimore Marathon this year, October 13, 2012. This has been an exciting year, and the marathon will be run one week before we celebrate my son’s first birthday.

This is my first 26.2, and I’ll be wearing a WorldRelief jersey and standing with others from Baltimore who want to support World Relief in their missionary work around the globe. I have had a chance to meet some of the men who work in this organization, some of whom will also be racing, and I am excited to ask you to consider financially supporting their work by visiting my support page: http://worldrelief.org/fertileparadox.

“If you run without a reason, you are just chasing the wind.” –Wesley Korir, 2012 Boston Marathon Champion

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